October, 21 2017

855-322-0783

Life insurance reviews, news and prices from the top companies

MetLife Life Insurance Ratings 2016

MetLife Life Insurance Ratings 2016

MetLife Life Insurance Ratings 2016

 

There are many different rating agencies in America that assess life insurance companies. The foremost authority in rating agencies is A.M. Best. This is the primary rating you should use in looking how strong the insurer is financially. There are three other “main” rating agencies which I will list below along with MetLife’s life insurance rating.

 

A.M. Best

New York Life Insurance Rating

MetLife Life Insurance Rating 2016 A.M. Best: A+

 

A.M. Best Ratings Scale

Secure Vulnerable
A++, A+ (Superior) B, B- (Fair)
A, A- (Excellent) C++, C+ (Marginal)
B++, B+ (Good) C, C- (Weak)
  D (Poor)
  E (Under Regulatory Supervision)
  F (In Liquidation)
  S (Suspended)

 

Fitch

Fitch Ratings NY Life

MetLife Life Insurance Rating Fitch 2016: AA-

 

Fitch Ratings Scale

AAA: Highest credit quality.
‘AAA’ ratings denote the lowest expectation of default risk. They are assigned only in cases of exceptionally strong capacity for payment of financial commitments. This capacity is highly unlikely to be adversely affected by foreseeable events.

AA: Very high credit quality.
‘AA’ ratings denote expectations of very low default risk. They indicate very strong capacity for payment of financial commitments. This capacity is not significantly vulnerable to foreseeable events.

A: High credit quality.
‘A’ ratings denote expectations of low default risk. The capacity for payment of financial commitments is considered strong. This capacity may, nevertheless, be more vulnerable to adverse business or economic conditions than is the case for higher ratings.

BBB: Good credit quality.
‘BBB’ ratings indicate that expectations of default risk are currently low. The capacity for payment of financial commitments is considered adequate but adverse business or economic conditions are more likely to impair this capacity.

BB: Speculative.
‘BB’ ratings indicate an elevated vulnerability to default risk, particularly in the event of adverse changes in business or economic conditions over time; however, business or financial flexibility exists which supports the servicing of financial commitments.

B: Highly speculative.
‘B’ ratings indicate that material default risk is present, but a limited margin of safety remains. Financial commitments are currently being met; however, capacity for continued payment is vulnerable to deterioration in the business and economic environment.

CCC: Substantial credit risk.
Default is a real possibility.

CC: Very high levels of credit risk.
Default of some kind appears probable.

C: Exceptionally high levels of credit risk.
Default is imminent or inevitable, or the issuer is in standstill.

 

Moody’s Investors Service

MetLife Life Insurance Rating Moody’s 2016: Aa3

 

Moody’s Ratings Scale

»Aaa– highest rating, representing minimum credit risk

»Aa1, Aa2, Aa3– high-grade

»A1, A2, A3– upper-medium grade

»Baa1, Baa2, Baa3– medium grade

 

Standard & Poor’s

New York Life Insurance Rating S& P

MetLife Life Insurance Rating S&P 2016: AA-

 

S&P Ratings Scale

AAA An obligation rated ‘AAA’ has the highest rating assigned by Standard & Poor’s. The obligor’s capacity to meet its financial commitment on the obligation is extremely strong.
AA An obligation rated ‘AA’ differs from the highest-rated obligations only to a small degree. The obligor’s capacity to meet its financial commitment on the obligation is very strong.
A An obligation rated ‘A’ is somewhat more susceptible to the adverse effects of changes in circumstances and economic conditions than obligations in higher-rated categories. However, the obligor’s capacity to meet its financial commitment on the obligation is still strong.
BBB An obligation rated ‘BBB’ exhibits adequate protection parameters. However, adverse economic conditions or changing circumstances are more likely to lead to a weakened capacity of the obligor to meet its financial commitment on the obligation.
BB; B; CCC; CC; and C Obligations rated ‘BB’, ‘B’, ‘CCC’, ‘CC’, and ‘C’ are regarded as having significant speculative characteristics. ‘BB’ indicates the least degree of speculation and ‘C’ the highest. While such obligations will likely have some quality and protective characteristics, these may be outweighed by large uncertainties or major exposures to adverse conditions.
BB An obligation rated ‘BB’ is less vulnerable to nonpayment than other speculative issues. However, it faces major ongoing uncertainties or exposure to adverse business, financial, or economic conditions which could lead to the obligor’s inadequate capacity to meet its financial commitment on the obligation.
B An obligation rated ‘B’ is more vulnerable to nonpayment than obligations rated ‘BB’, but the obligor currently has the capacity to meet its financial commitment on the obligation. Adverse business, financial, or economic conditions will likely impair the obligor’s capacity or willingness to meet its financial commitment on the obligation.
CCC An obligation rated ‘CCC’ is currently vulnerable to nonpayment, and is dependent upon favorable business, financial, and economic conditions for the obligor to meet its financial commitment on the obligation. In the event of adverse business, financial, or economic conditions, the obligor is not likely to have the capacity to meet its financial commitment on the obligation.
CC An obligation rated ‘CC’ is currently highly vulnerable to nonpayment. The ‘CC’ rating is used when a default has not yet occurred, but Standard & Poor’s expects default to be a virtual certainty, regardless of the anticipated time to default.
C An obligation rated ‘C’ is currently highly vulnerable to nonpayment,and the obligation is expected to have lower relative seniority or lower ultimate recovery compared to obligations that are rated higher.
D An obligation rated ‘D’ is in default or in breach of an imputed promise. For non-hybrid capital instruments, the ‘D’ rating category is used when payments on an obligation are not made on the date due, unless Standard & Poor’s believes that such payments will be made within five business days in the absence of a stated grace period or within the earlier of the stated grace period or 30 calendar days. The ‘D’ rating also will be used upon the filing of a bankruptcy petition or the taking of similar action and where default on an obligation is a virtual certainty, for example due to automatic stay provisions. An obligation’s rating is lowered to ‘D’ if it is subject to a distressed exchange offer.
NR This indicates that no rating has been requested, or that there is insufficient information on which to base a rating, or that Standard & Poor’s does not rate a particular obligation as a matter of policy.

 

Comdex Score

MetLife Life Insurance Comdex Score 2016: 94

 

The Comdex score is the average ranking a company receives from the four major rating agencies in America.  Rather than using letters, Comdex uses numbers on a scale of one to one hundred, with one hundred being the highest possible score and one being the lowest score.

 

MetLife Life Insurance Ratings 2016

As you can see MetLife is very highly rated by the four major rating agencies, making them a company you can feel comfortable with knowing they’ll be around to protect your family.

For our review of MetLife, click here.

Does MetLife have the lowest rates? Click on the green button below and use the quote engine to compare rates.